Feline Vaccines

What is the schedule for the core vaccinations for my cat?

Vaccine
Type of vaccine Age and frequency
of vaccination
Associated disease
Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis* Modified Live Virus

Initial series is given at 6-8, 12, and 16 weeks of age.  Revaccination is continued 1 year following the initial series and every 3 years thereafter

Feline viral rhinotracheitis (FVR) is a highly contagious respiratory disease characterized by sneezing, loss of appetite, fever, and inflammation of the eyes.  As the disease progresses ocular and nasal discharge is noticeable with secondary bacterial infections, as well as ulceration of the corneas.
Feline
Calicivirus*
Modified
Live Virus

Initial series is given at 6-8, 12, and 16 weeks of age.  Revaccination is continued 1 year following the initial series and every 3 years thereafter

Feline calicivirus (FCV) is another serious respiratory infection often occurring simultaneously with feline viral rhinotracheitis.  Signs are similar to FVR, but calicivirus-infected cats may also have ulcerations in the oral cavity.
Feline Panleukopenia* Modified
Live Virus
Initial series is given at 6-8, 12, and 16 weeks of age.  Revaccination is continued 1 year following the initial series and every 3 years thereafter

Feline panleukopenia is caused by a parvovirus which results in a serious and potentially fatal gastrointestinal disease in kittens and young cats.  Kittens can be infected in utero and may abort or be born with serious neurologic abnormalities.

Rabies Virus

Killed Vaccine

                    

A single dose of vaccine should be given no earlier than 12 weeks of age. Revaccination is continued 1 year following the initial dose and every 3 years thereafter.

Rabies virus causes a fatal neurological disease, and infected cats are a potential source for human infection.  State and local laws mandate rabies vaccination for cats.

Are there additional vaccines that my cat should receive beyond the core vaccinations?

 Vaccine     

Type of vaccine

Age and frequency of  vaccination

Associated disease
Feline Leukemia
 Virus (FeLV)

Killed
vaccine

Initial series is given as early as 10 weeks of age and should be boostered 3-4 weeks later.  Revaccination is continued on an annual basis thereafter.

Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection can result in a nonregenerative anemia, cancer of the lymphatic system or bone marrow, several degenerative diseases, and immunosuppression.  The virus is transmitted to susceptible cats through close contact with FeLV-infected cats.  Cats that are infected with FeLV may remain asymptomatic for several years but continue to be contagious to other cats.